How to Make Your Own Apple Cider Vinegar

How to Make Your Own Apple Cider Vinegar

Apples are one of those fruits that you love to make stuff with, such as pies and crisps. But, have you ever thought about making your own apple cider vinegar?

The Health Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is rich in bioactive phenolic compounds such as acetic acid, gallic acid, catechin, epicatechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and coumaric acid [1]. It also contains antioxidant properties [2].

The Many Uses of Apple Cider Vinegar

In the Kitchen

In the Kitchen

Apple cider vinegar is often thought of as an essential cooking and baking ingredient because of its taste and versatility. It adds flavour to salad dressings, provides a lift to your baking, makes your meats more tender, and gives a kick to your homemade pickles.

As a Cleaner

As a Cleaner

The cleansing properties of apple cider vinegar make it a cheap and safe alternative to commercial chemical-laden cleaning products. Diluted with water, apple cider vinegar makes an effective general cleaning agent for surfaces. You can also use it as an odour neutralizer for your fridge or as a rinse to remove chemicals from your produce.

As a Beauty Product

As a Beauty Product

Make sure to dilute apple cider vinegar with water before using it on your body. Straight vinegar is highly acidic and using it without dilution can be irritating to the skin and mucous membranes. I recommend equal parts vinegar and water. If this combination is still too strong for you, add more water.

Here are a few ways good ‘ole apple cider vinegar can be used in your beauty regiment:

  • Give your hair an apple cider vinegar rinse to help remove product buildup
  • Apply an apple cider vinegar astringent to your face to cleanse and balance your skin
  • Soak your feet in an apple cider vinegar bath to help eliminate foot odours
  • Gargle for a few minutes to help eliminate bad breath

How to Make Apple Cider Vinegar

How to Make Apple Cider Vinegar

Unprocessed and unfiltered vinegar often looks cloudy and has little bits floating in it. You may think this means your vinegar has gone bad, but it’s just the opposite. It indicates that the vinegar is rich in vitamins, minerals, and amino acids.

Ingredients

  • A 500 mL wide mouth canning jar
  • A 125 mL canning jar
  • 1 medium organic apple (enough to fill the 500 mL jar 3/4 full)
  • 1 tbsp of organic cane sugar
  • 1/2 cup of filtered water
  • 1 coffee filter
  • 1 rubber band

Directions:

  1. Clean both canning jars well and let them air dry.
  2. Roughly chop the apple into small pieces and place it in the 500 mL jar.
  3. Dissolve sugar in the filtered water.
  4. Pour water and sugar mix over apples until completely submerged.
  5. Place the 125 mL jar into the 500 mL jar to weigh down the apples that float to the top. Any apples exposed to the air risk going moldy.
  6. Cover the top of the jar with the coffee filter and secure it with the rubber band.
  7. Place the jar in a dark, room temperature cabinet for three weeks. Check on it every few days to make sure the apples are still submerged and no mold is forming.
  8. After three weeks strain the liquid from the apple pieces and return the liquid to the jar. Compost the apple pieces. At this point, the mixture should smell sweet.
  9. Re-cover the 500 mL jar containing the liquid with the coffee filter and rubber band.
  10. Place the jar back into the dark, room temperature cabinet for 3–4 more weeks, stirring every few days.
  11. When the apple cider vinegar has reached the flavour you enjoy, replace the coffee filter with a lid and transfer it to your refrigerator for storage.

If you can’t wait for your homemade apple cider vinegar to ferment, you can always purchase a bottle at your local health food store.

References:

[1] Budak, N. H., Aykin, E., Seydim, A. C., Greene, A. K. and Guzel-Seydim, Z. B. Functional Properties of Vinegar. Journal of Food Science. 2014: 79: R757–R764. PMC. Web. 11 Oct. 2016.

[2] Johnston, Carol S., and Amanda Buller. Vinegar and Peanut Products as Complementary Foods to Reduce Postprandial Glycemia. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2005: 105(12):1939-1942. PMC. Web. 11 Oct. 2016.